Problems and prospects of fisheries development in North eastern India

shaikhom inaotombi, Prabin Chandra Mahanta

Abstract


The northeast region of India is bestowed with high aquatic resources. More than 95% of the population are fish eaters and there is a huge demand for fish. In order to fill the gap between supply and demand, efforts for aquaculture development and expansion is crucial. Aquaculture practices in this region can generate income and provide food security to the underprivileged population. Culture of ornamental fish species and ecotourism development can facilitate conservation of fisheries resources and safeguard for its future scope.


Keywords


Northeast India, Aquaculture, prospect, approaches, conservation

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References


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